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Book : Introduction to Radar Systems - Third Edition (2002)

Introduction to Radar Systems - Third Edition

Categories: AerospaceDefenceTechnology

Tags: bookradarskolniktechnology

Publisher:McGraw Hill

Author(s):Skolnik, Merill Ivan

Published: 2002 • ISBN: 0072881380 • 772 pages • Delivery Format: Hard Copy - Hardback

Available from: Amazon (UK)Amazon (DE)

Summary

From The Publisher

Since the publication of the second edition of 'Introduction to Radar Systems', there has been continual development of new radar capabilities and continual improvements to the technology and practice of radar.

This growth has necessitated the addition and updating of the following topics for the third edition:

  • digital technology,
  • automatic detection and tracking,
  • doppler technology,airborne radar,
  • and target recognition.

The topic coverage is one of the great strengths of the text. In addition to a thorough revision of topics,and deletion of obsolete material,the author has added end-of-chapter problems to enhance the "teachability" of this classic book in the classroom,as well as for self-study for practicing engineers.

Content / Structure

Preface

Chapter 1 - An Introduction to Radar

  • 1.1 Basic Radar
  • 1.2 The Simple Form of the Radar Equation
  • 1.3 Radar Block Diagram
  • 1.4 Radar Frequencies
  • 1.5 Applications of Radar
  • 1.6 The Origins of Radar
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 2 - The Radar Equation

  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Detection of Signals in Noise
  • 2.3 receiver Noise and the Signal-to-Noise Ratio
  • 2.4 Probability Density Functions
  • 2.5 Probabilities of Detection and False Alarm
  • 2.6 Integration of Radar Pulses
  • 2.7 Radar Cross Section of Targets
  • 2.8 Radar Cross Section Fluctuations
  • 2.9 Transmitter Power
  • 2.10 Pulse Repetition Frequency
  • 2.11 Antenna Parameters
  • 2.12 System Losses
  • 2.13 Other Radar Equation Considerations
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 3 - MTI and Pulse Doppler Radar

  • 3.1 Introduction to Doppler and MTI Radar
  • 3.2 Delay-Line Cancelers
  • 3.3 Staggered Pulse Repetition Frequencies
  • 3.4 Doppler Filter Banks
  • 3.5 Digital MTI Processing
  • 3.6 Moving Target Detector
  • 3.7 Limitations to MTI Performance
  • 3.8 MTI from a Moving Platform (AMTI)
  • 3.9 Pulse Doppler Radar
  • 3.10 Other Doppler Radar Topics
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 4 - Tracking Radar

  • 4.1 Tracking with Radar
  • 4.2 Monopulse Tracking
  • 4.3 Conical Scan and Sequential Lobing
  • 4.4 Limitations to Tracking Accuracy
  • 4.5 Low-Angle Tracking
  • 4.6 Tracking in Range
  • 4.7 Other Tracking Radar Topics
  • 4.8 Comparison of Trackers
  • 4.9 Automatic Tracking with Surveillance Radars (ADT)
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 5 - Detection of Signals in Noise

  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Matched-Filter Criteria
  • 5.3 Detection Criteria
  • 5.4 Detectors
  • 5.5 Automatic Detection
  • 5.6 Integrators
  • 5.7 Constant-False-Alarm Rate Receivers
  • 5.8 The Radar Operator
  • 5.9 Signal Management

Chapter 6 - Information from Radar Signals

  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Basic Radar Measurements
  • 6.3 Theoretical Accuracy of Radar Measurements
  • 6.4 Ambiguity Diagram
  • 6.5 Pulse Compression
  • 6.6 Target Recognition
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 7 - Radar Clutter

  • 7.1 Introduction to Radar Clutter
  • 7.2 Surface-Cluuer Radar Equation
  • 7.3 Land Clutter
  • 7.4 Sea Clutter
  • 7.5 Statistical Models for Surface Clutter
  • 7.6 Weather Clutter
  • 7.7 Other SOurces of Atmospheric Echoes
  • 7.8 Detection of Targets in Clutter
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 8 - Propagation of Radar Waves

  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Forward Scattering from a Flat Earth
  • 8.3 Scattering from the Round Earth's Surace
  • 8.4 Atmospheric Refraction - Standard Propagation
  • 8.5 Nonstandard Propagation
  • 8.6 Diffraction
  • 8.7 Attenuation by Atmospheric Gases
  • 8.8 External, or Environmental, Noise
  • 8.9 Other Propagation Effects
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 9 - The Radar Antenna

  • 9.1 Functions of the Radar Antenna
  • 9.2 Antenna Parameters
  • 9.3 Antenna Radiation Pattern and Aperture Illumination
  • 9.4 Reflector Arrays
  • 9.5 Electronically Steered Phased Array Antennas
  • 9.6 Phase Shifters
  • 9.7 Frequency-Scan Arrays
  • 9.8 Radiators for Phased Arrays
  • 9.9 Architectures for Phased Arrays
  • 9.10 Mechanically Steered Phased Array Antennas
  • 9.11 Radiation Pattern Synthesis
  • 9.12 Effects of errors on Radiation Patterns
  • 9.13 Low-Sidelobe Antennas
  • 9.14 Cost of Phased Array Radars
  • 9.15 Other Topics Concerning Phased Arrays
  • 9.16 Systems Aspects of Phased Array Radars
  • 9.17 Other Antenna Topics
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 10 - Radar Transmitters

  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Linear-Beam Power Tubes
  • 10.3 Solid-State RF Power Sources
  • 10.4 Magnetron
  • 10.5 Crossed-Field Amplifiers
  • 10.6 Other RF Power Sources
  • 10.7 Other Aspects of Radar Transmitters
  • References
  • Problems

Chapter 11 - The Radar Receiver

  • 11.1 The Radar Receiver
  • 11.2 Receiver Noise Figure
  • 11.3 Supereheterodyne Receiver
  • 11.4 Duplexers and Radar Protectors
  • 11.5 Radar Displays
  • References
  • Problems

Index

Copyright 2001, 1980, 1962 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

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