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Book : Introduction to Systems Engineering (2000)

Introduction to Systems Engineering

Publisher:John Wiley & Sons

Author(s):Sage, Andrew P.Armstrong, James E.

Published: 2000 • ISBN: 0471027669 • 547 pages • Delivery Format: Hard Copy - Hardback

Available from: Amazon (US)Amazon (UK)Amazon (DE)

Summary

From the publisher:

Systems engineering (SE), or the engineering of large-scale systems, is key to achieving reliable, efficient, cost-effective products and services in diverse fields, including communication and network systems, software engineering, information systems, manufacturing, command and control, and defense systems acquisition and procurement.

This book offers a unique introduction to the world of systems engineering, focusing on analysis and problem-solving techniques that can be applied throughout the life cycle of product systems and service systems. While the authors provide a framework for the functional levels involved in systems engineering processes and system management, the bulk of the discussion is devoted to the practical application of formulation, analysis, and interpretation methods.

Through the use of real-world examples and useful graphs, readers will learn to:

  • Choose the most appropriate methods and tools for a given project
  • Apply issue formulation methods to assure that the right problem has been identified
  • Work with formal analysis methods to assure that the problem is solved correctly
  • Apply issue interpretation methods to insure that decisions reflect human values and technological realities, and thereby make interpretation work for them in the decision-making process
  • Develop an appreciation for the engineering and troubleshooting of large systems

Content / Structure

Preface

1 Introduction to Systems Engineering

  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Systems Engineers
  • 1.3 The Systems Point of View
  • 1.4 Definition of Systems Engineering
  • 1.5 History of Technological Development
  • 1.6 Systems Engineering Knowledge
  • 1.7 Challenges and Pitfalls in Systems Engineering
  • 1.8 Systems Engineering Education
  • 1.9 Other Systems Engineering, and Related Systems Theory, Studies
  • 1.10 Summary

2 Methodological Frameworks and Systems Engineering Processes

  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Methodological Framework for Systems Acquisition or Production
    • 2.2.1 Logical Steps of Systems Engineering
    • 2.2.2 Life-Cycle Phases of Systems Engineering
    • 2.2.3 A Two-Dimensional Framework for Systems Engineering
    • 2.2.4 Life Cycles, or Stages of Systems Engineering
    • 2.2.5 Systems Engineering Processes
  • 2.3 Other Specific Life-Cyle Methodologies for Systems Acquisition, Production or Procurement
    • 2.3.1 A Seven-Phase Life-Cycle for System Acquisition or Product Development
    • 2.3.2 A Twenty-Two Phase Life-Cycle
    • 2.3.3 Defense Systems Acquisition Life-Cycles
  • 2.4 Life Cycles Patterned After the Waterfall Model
  • 2.5 Summary

3 Formulation of Issues

  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Situation Assessment
  • 3.3 Approaches to Situation Assessment
  • 3.4 Problem or Issue Identification
    • 3.4.1 Scoping and Bounding the System
    • 3.4.2 Systems Definition Matrix
    • 3.4.3 Needs and Constraints: Identification and Analysis
    • 3.4.4 Input-Output Matrix
  • 3.5 Value System Design
    • 3.5.1 Objectives Hierarchies or Trees
    • 3.5.2 Objectives Measures or Design Criteria
  • 3.6 Formulation of Issues Example
    • 3.6.1 Fuel Reserves: Fossil Fuels
    • 3.6.2 Fuel Reserves: Nonfossil Fuels
    • 3.6.3 Refined Energy
    • 3.6.4 Consumed Energy
    • 3.6.5 Problem Definition - Identification of Needs
    • 3.6.6 Problem Definition - Identification of Alterables
    • 3.6.7 Problem Definition - Identification of Constraints
    • 3.6.8 Problem Definition - Identification of Societal Sectors
    • 3.6.9 Value System Design - Defining Objectives
    • 3.6.10 Value System Design - Objectives Measures
    • 3.6.11 System Synthesis
  • 3.7 Relationships Between Issue Formulation and Design and Development Efforts
    • 3.7.1 Functional Decomposition and Design and Development Efforts
    • 3.7.2 Functional Analysis and Business Process Reengineering
    • 3.7.3 Quality Function Deployment
  • 3.8 The Systems Engineering Requirements Statement
    • 3.8.1 User requirements
    • 3.8.2 System requirements and Specifications
  • 3.9 Generation of Alternatives or System Synthesis
    • 3.9.1 Brainstorming and Brainwriting
    • 3.9.2 Groupware
    • 3.9.3 Delphi Methods
    • 3.9.4 Morphological Box Approach
  • 3.10 Feasibility Studies
    • 3.10.1 Feasibility Screening
    • 3.10.2 Architecture and Standards
    • 3.10.3 Feasibility Criteria
  • 3.11 Summary
    • Problems
    • References

4 Analysis of Alternatives

  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Analysis of Systems with Uncertain and Imperfect Information
    • 4.2.1 Cross-Impact Analysis Models
    • 4.2.2 Hierarchical Inference and Extensions
    • 4.2.3 Logical Reasoning Models and Inference
    • 4.2.4 Complications Affecting Inference and Cross-Impact Analysis
  • 4.3 Structural Modelling: Trees, Causal Loops, and Influence Diagrams
    • 4.3.1 Tree Structures
    • 4.3.2 Causal Loop Diagrams and Influence Diagrams
  • 4.4 System Dynamics Models and Extensions
    • 4.4.1 Population Models
    • 4.4.2 System Dynamics
    • 4.4.3 Workshop Dynamic Models
    • 4.4.4 Summary
  • 4.5 Economic Models and Economic Systems Analysis
    • 4.5.1 Present Value Analysis
    • 4.5.2 Economic Appraisal Methods for Benefits and Costs Over Time
    • 4.5.3 Systematic Measurements of Effort and Schedule
    • 4.5.4 Work Breakdown Structure and Cost Breakdown Structure
    • 4.5.5 Cost-Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis
    • 4.5.6 Summary
  • 4.6 Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Supportability Models
  • 4.7 Discrete Event Models, Networks, and Graphs
    • 4.7.1 Network Flows
    • 4.7.2 Stochastic Networks and Markov Models
    • 4.7.3 Queuing Models and Queuing Network Optimzation
    • 4.7.4 Discrete Event Digital Simulation
    • 4.7.5 Time-Series and Regression Models
  • 4.8 Evaluation of Large Scale Models
  • 4.9 Summary
    • Problems
    • References

5 Interpretation of Alternative Courses of Action and Decision-Making

  • 5.1 Introduction: Types of Decisions
  • 5.2 Formal Decisions
    • 5.2.1 Prescriptive and Normative Decision Assessments
    • 5.2.2 A Formal Normative Model for Decision Assessment
    • 5.2.3 Decision Assessment with No prior Information on Uncertainties
    • 5.2.4 Decision Assessment Under Conditions of Event Outcome Uncertainty
    • 5.2.5 Utility Theory
    • 5.2.6 Multiple Attribute Utility Theory
  • 5.3 Group Decision Making and Voting
    • 5.3.1 Voting Approaches
    • 5.3.2 Potential Problems with Voting: Some Illustrative Examples
    • 5.3.3 Ordinal Social Welfare Functions
    • 5.3.4 Modifications to Achieve a Social Welfare Function
    • 5.3.5 Cardinal Social Welfare Functions
  • 5.4 Summary
    • Problems
    • References

6 Systems Engineering and Systems Engineering Management

  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Systems Engineering Organisational Structures
  • 6.3 Pragmatics of Systems Management
  • 6.4 Systems Engineering Methods for Systems Engineering Management
    • 6.4.1 Network-Based Systems Planning and Management Methods
    • 6.4.2 Bar Charts
    • 6.4.3 Cost Estimation methods and Work/Cost Breakdown Structures
  • 6.5 Human and Cognitive Factors in Systems Engineering and Systems Management
    • 6.5.1 Rationality Perspectives
    • 6.5.2 Human error and Systems Engineering
  • 6.6 Summary
    • Problems
    • References

Copyright 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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