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Book : Systems Engineering: Coping With Complexity (1998)

Systems Engineering: Coping With Complexity

Publisher:Prentice Hall

Author(s):Jackson, KenArnold, StuartStevens, RichardBrook, Peter

Published: 1998 • ISBN: 0130950858 • 384 pages • Delivery Format: Hard Copy - Paperback

Available from: Amazon (US)Amazon (UK)Amazon (DE)

Summary

From the publisher:

In an age of shrinking development cycles, it is harder than ever to bring the right product to the market at the right time. Good product - especially complex products - are underpinned by good systems, and systems engineering itself is recognized as the key tool of product development.

This book covers the principles of systems engineering in an easy-to-read format.

The authors have decades of practical industrial experience, and the material is ideal for industrial project teams. For academic courses, the book acts as a component for graduate and undergraduate engineering studies, particularly those on systems engineering.

It covers how to handle requirements, architectural design, integration and verification, starting from the perspective of a simple linear lifecycle. The book then gradually introduces recent work on the complexity of real-world systems, with issues such as multi-level systems development, software within systems, and iterative development. There is also coverage of the impact of systems engineering at the organizational level.

Content / Structure

1 Introduction

  • 1.1 The Importance of Systems Engineering
  • 1.2 What is Systems Engineering?
  • 1.3 Management and Systems Engineering
  • 1.4 The Systems Life Cycle
  • 1.5 Requirements Through the Life Cycle
  • 1.6 Structure of the Book
  • 1.7 Summary

2 The User Requirement Process

  • 2.1 Objectives for User Requirements
  • 2.2 User and System Requirements
  • 2.3 The Environment
  • 2.4 Business Requirements
  • 2.5 Sources of User Requirements
  • 2.6 Organizing the Requirements
  • 2.7 Constraints
  • 2.8 Attributes for User Requirements
  • 2.9 The User Requirements Document
  • 2.10 Reviewing the User Requirements
  • 2.11 Success Factors
  • 2.12 Summary of User Requirements

3 The System Requirements Process

  • 3.1 Defining the Solution in Abstract
  • 3.2 The System requirements Process
  • 3.3 Different Kinds of Requirements
  • 3.4 Abstract Definition
  • 3.5 External Systems
  • 3.6 Temporal and Dynamic Behavior
  • 3.7 Non-functional Requirements
  • 3.8 The Framework for System Requirements
  • 3.9 Concepts Used for Representing System Requirements
  • 3.10 Object-Orientation
  • 3.11 Heuristics for Breaking Down Functions
  • 3.12 Success Factors
  • 3.13 Outputs from System Requirements
  • 3.14 Summary of System Requirements

4 The Architectural Design Process

  • 4.1 The Objectives
  • 4.2 Good Design Practice
  • 4.3 What is an Architectural Design?
  • 4.4 Behavior and Style
  • 4.5 Architecture Requirements
  • 4.6 Re-use of Existing Components
  • 4.7 How to do Architectural Design
  • 4.8 Creating a Behavioral Model
  • 4.9 Layout
  • 4.10 Creating an Equipment Design Model
  • 4.11 Design Trade-offs
  • 4.12 Concurrent Engineering in Design
  • 4.13 Verification Work Before Testing
  • 4.14 Outputs from Architecture
  • 4.15 Summary of Architectural Design

5 From Integration to Operations

  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Integration and Verification
  • 5.3 Building the Verification System
  • 5.4 Installation and Validation
  • 5.5 Alpha and Beta-tests
  • 5.6 Project History
  • 5.7 Summary

6 Project Management and Systems Engineering

  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Project Management Tasks
  • 6.3 Configuration Management
  • 6.4 Verification and Validation
  • 6.5 Quality Assurance
  • 6.6 Decisions and Risks
  • 6.7 Summary

7 Tailoring the Simple Life Cycle

  • 7.1 The Reasons for Tailoring the Process
  • 7.2 The Sequential Life Cycle
  • 7.3 Different Kinds of Tailored Development
  • 7.4 Incremental Development
  • 7.5 Evolutionary Life Cycle
  • 7.6 Rapid Application Development
  • 7.7 Framework Architecture
  • 7.8 Competetive Piloting
  • 7.9 Design to Cost
  • 7.10 Re-engineering Existing Systems
  • 7.11 Smaller Systems
  • 7.12 Summary on Tailored Development

8 More Realistic Development Life Cycles

  • 8.1 The Need for a More Realistic Development Approach
  • 8.2 Three Different Processes
  • 8.3 Process Products and Additional Flows
  • 8.4 Feedback Before Commitment
  • 8.5 Multiple Levels of System Development
  • 8.6 Change in Complex Systems
  • 8.7 A Generic System Development Process
  • 8.8 Consequences of a More Realistic Approach
  • 8.9 Summary

9 Management in Multi-Level Projects

  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 The 'Enterprise'
  • 9.3 Customer-supplier Relationships
  • 9.4 Delegation and Escalation
  • 9.5 Program Engineering and Product Engineering
  • 9.6 Different Kinds of Acquisition
  • 9.7 Summary

10 Software and Systems

  • 10.1 The Information Economy
  • 10.2 Software and Market Leadership
  • 10.3 Problems of Software in Systems
  • 10.4 Software Shaped Systems
  • 10.5 The Software Engineering Process
  • 10.6 Differences Between Systems and Software
  • 10.7 The User Interface
  • 10.8 Summary About Software and Systems

11 Prototyping

  • 11.1 Prototyping in Various Guises
  • 11.2 Modelling and Simulation
  • 11.3 Summary on Prototyping

12 Information Modelling

  • 12.1 A Project as an Information System
  • 12.2 Defining an Information Model
  • 12.3 Example Applications
  • 12.4 Traceability
  • 12.5 Plans as Information Models
  • 12.6 Summary

13 Projects and the Enterprise

  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Managing Through Stages
  • 13.3 Stage-gate Management
  • 13.4 The Product manager Role
  • 13.5 The Organizational Process
  • 13.6 Metrics for the Development Process
  • 13.7 Technology Management
  • 13.8 Multiple Operating Systems
  • 13.9 Summary

14 Improving the Systems Engineering Processes

  • 14.1 Agents for Chage
  • 14.2 Success Factors for Process Improvement
  • 14.3 Likely Causes of Failure
  • 14.4 Making the Business Case
  • 14.5 An Example of Costs and Benefits
  • 14.6 Business Experience
  • 14.7 Summary

15 Summary

  • 15.1 Concepts of Systems Engineering
  • 15.2 Wider Scope of Systems Engineering
  • 15.3 User-driven System Processes
  • 15.4 Realistic System Processes
  • 15.5 Becoming a Good Customer
  • 15.6 Systems Engineering and the Business
  • 15.7 Future System Life Cycle Processes
  • 15.8 Conclusions

Appendices

Copyright Prentice Hall Europe 1998

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