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Book : The Engineering Design of Systems: Models and Methods (2000)

The Engineering Design of Systems: Models and Methods

Publisher:John Wiley & Sons

Author(s):Buede, Dennis M.

Published: 2000 • ISBN: 0471282251 • 488 pages • Delivery Format: Hard Copy - Hardback

Available from: Amazon (DE)Amazon (UK)Amazon (US)

Summary

From the publisher:

A basic text for courses that involve the use of models and methods in the engineering design of systems, this book features topics concerning the systems engineering process and the modelling and design fundamentals needed to support this process. Industry uses many of the methods and models discussed in this book, but seldom in the integrated manner presented here.

Taking the approach that performing systems engineering activities involves modelling of many different types, this text aims to enable students to learn by experimenting with such modelling techniques. A number of generally understood systems are used to convey these modelling concepts and test the students’ ability to create realistic models.

Content / Structure

Preface

Part 1 Introduction, Overview, and Basic Knowledge

Chapter 1 Introductions to Systems Engineering

  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Overview of the Engineering of Systems
  • 1.3 Software Systems Engineering Analogies
  • 1.4 Introducing the Concept of Architectures
  • 1.5 Requirements
  • 1.6 System's Life Cycle
  • 1.7 Design and Integration Process
  • 1.8 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 2 Overview of the Systems Engineering Design Process

  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Design Process
    • 2.2.1 Key Terms
    • 2.2.2 Design
    • 2.2.3 Integration and Qualification
  • 2.3 Key Systems Engineering Concepts
    • 2.3.1 Operational Concept
    • 2.3.2 External Systems Diagram
    • 2.3.3 Objectives Hierarchy
    • 2.3.4 Requirements
    • 2.3.5 Functions
    • 2.3.6 Items
    • 2.3.7 Components
    • 2.3.8 Interfaces
    • 2.3.9 Verification
    • 2.3.10 Validation
    • 2.3.11 Acceptance
  • 2.4 Use of CORE (Systems Engineering Tool)
  • 2.5 Summary
  • Problem

Chapter 3 Modeling and Process Modeling

  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Models and Modeling
  • 3.3 IDEF0 Background
  • 3.4 IDEF0 Semantics or Elements
  • 3.5 IDEF0 Diagram Syntax
  • 3.6 IDEF0 Model Syntax
  • 3.7 IDEF0 Advanced Concepts
  • 3.8 Systems Engineering Use of IDEF0 Models
  • 3.9 Summary
  • Problem

Chapter 4 Discrete Mathematics: Sets, Relations, and Functions

  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Sets
    • 4.2.1 Writing Set Membership
    • 4.2.2 Describing Members of a Set
    • 4.2.3 Special Sets
    • 4.2.4 Operations on Sets
    • 4.2.6 Power Set
  • 4.3 Relations
    • 4.3.1 Ordered Pairs and Cartesian Products
    • 4.3.2 Unary and Binary Relations
    • 4.3.3 Properties of Unary Relations on A
    • 4.3.4 Partial Ordering
    • 4.3.5 Equivalence Relations
  • 4.4 Functions
    • 4.4.1 Definitions
    • 4.4.2 Composition
  • 4.5 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 5 Graphics and Directed Sets

  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Terminology
  • 5.3 Paths and Cycles
  • 5.4 Connectedness
  • 5.5 Adjacency and Reachability
  • 5.6 Unary Relations and Diagraphs
  • 5.7 Ordering Relations
  • 5.8 Isomorphisms
  • 5.9 Trees
    • 5.9.1 Spanning Trees
    • 5.9.2 Directed Trees
    • 5.9.3 Forest
  • 5.10 Finding Cycles and semigraphs in a Graph
  • 5.11 Revisiting IDEF0 Diagrams
  • 5.12 Summary

Part 2 Design and Integration Topics

Chapter 6 Requirements and Defining the Design Problem

  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Requirements
  • 6.3 Definitions
  • 6.4 Originating Requirements Development: Defining the Design Problem
  • 6.5 Requirements Categories
  • 6.6 Requirements Partition
  • 6.7 Originating Requirements Document(ORD)
  • 6.8 Characteristics of Sound Requirements
  • 6.9 Writing Requirements
  • 6.10 Operational Concept
  • 6.11 External Systems Design
  • 6.12 Objectives Hierarchy for Performance Requirements
  • 6.13 Prototyping and Usability Testing
  • 6.14 Defining the Originating Requirements
    • 6.14.1 Input/Output Requirements
    • 6.14.2 System-Wide and Technology Requirements
    • 6.14.3 Trade-Off Requirements
    • 6.14.4 Qualifications Requirements
  • 6.15 Requirements Management
  • 6.16 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 7 Functional and Architecture Development

  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Defining Terminology for a Functional Architecture
  • 7.3 Functional Architecture Development
    • 7.3.1 Functional Architecture Process Model
    • 7.3.2 Decomposition versus Composition
  • 7.4 Defining a Systems' Functions
    • 7.4.1 Approaches for Defining Functions
    • 7.4.2 Typical Functional Decompositions by Life-Cycle Phase
    • 7.4.3 Feedback and Control in Functional Design
    • 7.4.4 Evaluation of a Functional Hierarchy
  • 7.5 development of the Functional decomposition
  • 7.6 Finishing the Functional Architecture
  • 7.7 Tracing Requirements to Elements of the Functional Architecture
  • 7.8 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 8 Physical Architecture development

  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Generic versus Instantiated Physical Architectures
  • 8.3 Overview of Physical Architecture Development
  • 8.4 Creativity Techniques
    • 8.4.1 Morphological Box
    • 8.4.2 Option Creation Techniques
  • 8.5 Graphic Representations of the Physical Architecture
  • 8.6 Issues in Physical Architecture Development
    • 8.6.1 Major Concepts for Physical Architectures
    • 8.6.2 Use of Redundancy to Achieve Fault Tolerance
  • 8.7 Summary

Chapter 9 Operational Architecture Development

  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Overview
  • 9.3 Allocate Functions to Components
  • 9.4 Trace Non-Input/Output Requirements and Derive Requirements
    • 9.4.1 Derive Internal Input/Output Requirements
    • 9.4.2 Trace System-Wide Requirements and Derive Subsystem-Wide Requirements
    • 9.4.3 Trace Trade-Off Requirements and Derive Subsystem Trade-Off Requirements
    • 9.4.4 Trace Qualification Requirements and Derive Subsystem Qualification Requirements
  • 9.5 Define and Analyze Functional Activation and Control Structure
  • 9.6 Conduct Performance and Risk Analyses
  • 9.7 Document Architectures and Obtain Approval
  • 9.8 Document Subsystem Specifications
  • 9.9 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 10 Interface Design

  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Overview to Interface Development
  • 10.3 Interface Architectures
    • 10.3.1 Message Passing Architectures
    • 10.3.2 Shared Memory Architectures
    • 10.3.3 Network Architectures
  • 10.4 Standards
  • 10.5 Open Systems Interconnection Architecture
  • 10.6 Common Object Request Broker Architecture
  • 10.7 Interface Design Process
  • 10.8 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 11 Integration and Qualification

  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Distinctions Among Acceptance, Validation and Verification Testing
  • 11.3 Overview of Integration
  • 11.4 Alternate Integration Processes
  • 11.5 Qualification Planning During Design
  • 11.6 Qualification Methods
  • 11.7 Acceptance Testing
    • 11.7.1 deciding What to Test
    • 11.7.2 Usability
  • 11.8 Summary
  • Problems

Part 3 Supplemental Topics

Chapter 12 Graphical Modelling Techniques

  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Data Modeling
    • 12.2.1 Entity - Relationship Diagrams
    • 12.2.2 Higraphs
  • 12.3 Process Modeling
    • 12.3.1 Data Flow Diagrams
    • 12.3.2 N-Squared Charts
  • 12.4 Behavior Modeling
    • 12.4.1 Function Flow Block Diagrams
    • 12.4.2 Behavior Diagrams
    • 12.4.3 Finite State Machines and State Transaction Diagrams
    • 12.4.4 Statecharts
    • 12.4.5 Control Flow Diagrams
    • 12.4.6 Petri nets
  • 12.5 Object-Oriented Modeling
  • 12.6 Summary
  • Problems

Chapter 13 Decision Analysis for Design Trades

  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Elements of Decision Problems
  • 13.3 Axioms of Decision Analysis
  • 13.4 Multiattribute Value Analysis
    • 13.4.1 Eliciting Value Functions
    • 13.4.2 Eliciting Value Weights
  • 13.5 Uncertainty in Decisions
    • 13.5.1 Probability Theory
    • 13.5.2 Relevance Diagrams
    • 13.5.3 Influence Diagrams and Decision Trees
    • 13.5.4 Risk Preference and Expected Utility
  • 13.6 Sample Application
    • 13.6.1 MPWS Overview
    • 13.6.2 Operational Concept for MPWS
    • 13.6.3 External Systems Diagrams
    • 13.6.4 Requirements
    • 13.6.5 Use of Utility Curves and Weights
    • 13.6.6 Conclusions
  • 13.7 Summary
  • Problems

Appendix A: Outline of Systems Engineering Documents

Appendix B: IDEF0 Model of the Engineering of a System

Glossary

References

Index

Copyright 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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